Classes and Workshops

 

Personal training for all the following progarms is also

available 

 

Classes 

 

Chi Kung - Yoga Energetics as an alternative medicine.

This program combines the essence of the two most popular therapeutic desciplines

including Taoist Yoga of China and Samadhi Yoga of India. This amalgamation fortifies

the effect of promoting good mental and physical health, beauty and spiritual growth. 

The practice includes Mindful walking Chikong breading, Chikong postures and Poses

to repair and strengthen Muscles, Bones Tendons and Restore the nervious system

improves flexibility. Improves mental focus and concentration and tolrence for longer 

meditation. 

 

Tai Chi - Chi Kung  

In addition to the forms and techniques of classical Tai Chi, the practice of Tai Chi-Chi

Kung also includes forms and technique from Chikung, Yoga and Zen. 

   

Zenki-Do: The Spirit of Martial Arts

This Internal Martial Arts embraces the three main goals to be Aqcuired and

Maintained including good Mental, Phisical Health, Overall Vitality and Self Steam.

Workshops and Retreats 

The Art of Healthy Living Workshop

This workshop focuses on three principles of Right Understanding,  Right Saddhanas

(Practice) and Right Diet. .

The participants of this workshop will learn about the functions of their body systems

from an Tradittional Oriental Medicine point of view.

Identifying the foods that are most suitable for their body system  and establish an

enjoyable health-promoting daily routine practice (Saddhana) in the comfort of their

own home. 

The Art of Self Healing Chi Kung as an Alternative Medicine

This workshop teaches selfcare Chi kung Massage. The participents learn more about

their entire body systems including, muscle system, meridian network, bones and skin

systms along massage techniqus to relax the muscles and release pain and

discomfort.  

These workshops also being offered on a weekend in different locations all through

Canada and United States. To find out more on the weekend locations, revisit

centrefortheways.com/ workshops.

TO INQUIRE or REGISTER

Please email info@centrefortheways.com or call (438) 364-9768

 

For more detailed introduction to aove classes and workshop please visit the page on overvews. 

 

Zenki-Do: The Spirit of Martial Arts

This Internal Martial Arts embraces the three main goals to be Aqcuired and

Maintained including good Mental, Phisical Health, Overall Vitality and Self Steam.

 

How it developed?

 

After studying and diligently practicing different forms of yoga including Taoist yoga and Samadhi 

yoga (commonly known as Eight-fold yoga) and martial arts including Karate-Do, Taekwando,

Aikido,Taichi chuan and Chi Kung as well as healing arts which include acupuncture, Shiatsu,

Tuina, Riki and so on I came to a conclusion that none of these arts by itself was complete,

fully effective or fully productive. Meanly because despite their historic connections to various

philosophies they have been separated from their roots due to ignorance of their advocates or by

the reality of time and space or both. It is unfortunate that in recent years not only the natural

nutritional values of our foods, purity our water and  air have been compromised for convenience

and higher profits but also the fundamental values of living arts including music, yoga and martial

arts have sacroficed meanly for the same ground. Based on this observation I have dedicated

nearly three decades of my life to develop this comprehensive system of martial art to revitalize

most if not all of the lost virtues of these martial arts and Healing Arts. 

 

1. Zenki-Do the spirit of mortail arts. 

The process:

With understanding that in order to bring positive changes to any system we need to start from the

Root Cause. Accordingly I spent lots of time studying the philosophical roots of these arts. From

China I chosen the Taoism, from India I picked Yoga from Japan Zen. After completion of my

philosophical reaserch I started harmonizing my practices with their root causes meaning the

philosophies, a new system was created. After mastering the new systems I started to intruduce

them  to my student and named it Zenki-Do the spirit of martial art with three virtues as follows;

The three Virtues of Zenki-Do include Courage, Compassion and Wisdom. 

1. Courage shall be accompanied with Compassion which include Love, Peace and

Forgiveness to include all while excluding none. 

2. Compassion shall be accompanied with Wisdom (The way of Strategy). 

3. Wisdom shall be contained with Right understanding of the 5 universal principles of

Realities. 

 

Zenki-Do As an Art of Healthy Living:

Zenki-Do as the art of healthy living embraces the three main principles to aqcuires and maitains good mental, phisical health and over all vitality. 

The three main principles include The principles of Right undestanding, Righ consumption and Right Sadhans (daily routine practice) 8888

The first principle In Zenkido is the thorough understandinf of the Body Physio Energetics

Here we explain the physical body from from an Oriental Medicine Prospective. 

Although the anatomy and physiology of Western Medicine contributed great deal to Western Medical

Science but they are not sufficient enough to deal with the complicated health problem of the day without

priscriptin drugs or surgery. Eventhough Science means knoledge but the modern medical systems have

been preoccupied mostly on intellectual information.

In this principle we introduce a system which includes the formation and transformation of three essential

substances of Chi, Blood and Nutritional body fluids which we refer to them as the Energetics System of

the body. This system connects all and every part of human body together and harmonizes the functional

activities of all other systems including the internal organs and nervous system to insure that they work

together as an integrated whole.

Please note that the energetics system of the human body is a huge field what we introduce here is a small

portion which are most relevent to the practic of Zenki-Do internal martial arts and Chikong-Yoga

energetics. 

Furthermore we explain the Energetics System of the body by breaking down into three main subsystems

which include

1. internal organs systems where the three essential substances of Chi, Blood and Nutritional body flueds

are being manufactured. 

2. The meridians system where the Chi (energy)  travels. 

3. The muscle system where the meridians are harboured. 

 

The theory of Yin and Yang in relation to the internal organs. 

The internal organs can be divided into two catigories of Yin and Yang. 

The Yin organs carry the yin (cool) enegy and include the Lung, Spleen, Heart, Kidney and Liver. 

The Yang organs carry the Yang (warm) energy and include Large Intestine, Stomach, Small intestine,

Urinary Bladder and Gallbladder. 

Each Yang organ is connected to a Yin organ via the Meridian system and together as a couple they

correspond to one of Five Elements of Nature as follow. 

Lungs (Yin) couples with Large intestine (Yang) and together they correspond to the Metal element. 

Splee (Yin) couples with Stomach (Yang) and together they corredpond to the Earth element. 

Heart (Yin) coupes with Small intestine (Yang)  and together they correspond to the Fire element 

Kidney (yin)  couples with Bladder (yang) and together they correspond to the Water element. 

Liver (Yin) couples with  gallblader. and together they correspond to Wood element. 

 

The functional activites of internal organs

The Lung System

Even though the main physiological functions of the lung are respiration and production of energy

including pure energy, defensive enery and as well as body fluids of both lucid and mucoid

typesbody fluids it is also responsible for purification of the entire body. as well as looking after

healthy skin and hair which are expose to the external disease factore such as cold, heat, wind,

polutions and so on. That make lung to be the most delicate organ in the human body as it can

easily be affected by external disease factors as well as internal disease factores such as emotion,

improper diet, smoking, improper breathing practices. In addition since the blood from all other

internal organs retun to the lung for purificantion and oxygenation therefore the disease of other

internal organ can be transmited to the lungs and vice versa. 

The Heart System

The heart is consider to be the captain of all other internal and extra organs in thehuman body.It

has the role of coordinating and networking all of them. It means if there is a problem wih the heart

the functional activites of all other organs will be affected. 

One of the physiological function of the Heart is controling the circulation of blood and govrning the

mind. As the flow of sufficient of blood and energy into the brain is necesary for the mind to do its

job adequately. In adition as the kindney system provides essential life force to the entire internal

and extra organs the Heart relays conciousness to all internal and extra organs. 

It is unfortunate that the everage individual know little about the functional activities of the internal

organs includin lungs, Kidney and the heart. The lack of such fundimental understanding takes its

toll on the body and the mind leading to veriuoos health disorders.

Please note that all the remaining of internal and extra organs have their own cause and effects on the health of

humen as well. but since their issues are beyond the scope of this documen we will skip the details

for now.  

 

The Art of  Strategy

Any strategist as well as ture practioneres of martial ars should know the following 5 Principles with right understanding. 

 

The Univere withhols the two aspects of Reality and the Truth. 

By Reality we mean the Hppenings while by Truth we mean The mystory byond discription it penetrates in ivery reality withou leaving a trace. It is here without being here. It is there without being there, so where is it? I don't know, Nobody knows. despite claims by many prophits, gurues and intellectual philosiphers the oposit of their claims are True. They given it name/names which it dosen't have. They given it emotions which it does not possess. They given it a gender which is fales. 

The Truth is nameless, emotionless, genderless It is the truth within the truth. It mystory unfathomable by intelectual senses. 

withhricteri cstc of  insustantiality, with metereal eistance. universe with its all procedures. It is in constant change through the law of karma (cause and effect), it is interdependent in its origin, nothing in the corporeal; Univers are accidental. All events are caused by another event. Every cause has an effect then every effect beconmes the cause for other events it contineues. it is dualistic in its polarity, it is limited in its capacity and it is collective as well as individual in its process.

The corporeal universe is a makeup of 5 Elements of Wood, Fire, Earth, Metal and Water. These Elements can be categorized into three qualities of Yin, Yang and Neutrality.
The Truth on the other hand is beyond the above descriptions being attributed to the Reality. Therefore it cannot be described in any linguistic fashion, it can only be realized  through the Extraordinary sense perception which is beyond the five bodily senses of seeing, hearing, smelling, tasting and feel
 

Our misunderstanding (ignorance) of the nature of Reality causes us an ongoing suffering. Because based on this misunderstanding we have the tendency to take the reality as the truth meaning that taking the worldly objects including our being for granted, as if they are here to stay unchangeable, imperishable, and permanent. Therefore we develop false attachment (dependency) to those events that are desirable to us and reject those which are not. Whenever the change happens in the desirable ones, we grieve and suffer; we also suffer for undesirables because we think they too are here to stay.
We must accept the fact that everything in the world of existence or Reality is subject to change including our appearance, our health, our wealth, our relationships, our family structure and everything we like or dislike. To minimize or prevent unnecessary sufferings we must differentiate between these two aspects and not to take Reality as the Truth or in other words don't get attached or dependant to the objects of corporeal world or Realities. 


2. The second Noble principle to understand and accept the Law of the Change
Change is the way of the nature; everything in nature changes constantly, but we cannot see all the moment to moment changes in the material world because some of them are too subtle for our intelect to percieve and our physical eyes to see. We can only see the big changes which are the more developed form of small changes which take place in a constant manner over time.
We have to train our mind to accept the fact that whatever begins, it will end and whatever ends starts with a new beginning for better or worse depending on our perception. But in the eye of the universe, change is neither desirable nor undesirable; it is only a part of universal process. It is us that categorize the changes into good or bad based on how they affect our life and livelihood or emotional state. If we understood this concept well, we would become the observers of the  changes rather than the sufferers of them.

3. The third Noble Principe is the Law of Karma
To many of us the concept of karma is not clearly defined. Some of us think that karma is an act of divine punishment or rewards. While some of us think that our karma has been predetermined as a part of our lifelong destiny and nothing can change it. Without disputing the above points of views we add our own definition of karma as it is a process of cause and effect. Whatever we do or don't do, it becomes the cause for something to follow as the following thing becomes the cause for something else and it continues in a non-stop manner. Since the cause is often much subtler then the effect, we cannot always see the cause and view the effect as an isolated event set by deities or accident or coincidence and so on. As I indicated above, nothing in the world of reality is absolute, my interpretation of the law of karma is also not absolute. It too has a certain degree of contradiction which opens the door for an ongoing search for the truth. For example what makes us to do or don't do something which causes an either desirable or undesirable effect?
Some may wonder how much of a role we play in the determination of our own karma. My answer is that we do have some control over our destiny but not the whole control. Some may say we are the architect of our own destiny, which is partly true because other factors including human factors and environmental elements also play some role in our decisions, actions or inaction. For example we can restrict ourselves to a healthy lifestyle but what about the environmental effects, particularly environmental pollution in the air we breathe, the water we drink or the food we eat? Or the effect of authorities including rule of law, social, cultural, educational and religious influences, or our inherited constitution, or the role that parents and children plays in our decision, actions or inaction? And yet it doesn’t mean that we should give up on our individual role to play our part in the formation of our destiny to the best of our ability.

4. The fourth Noble principle is the Law of interdependency of universal events
In creation everything nominal or phenomenal are interdependent in their origin. Nothing exists in isolation. Everything exists because something else caused it and everything becomes the cause for something else; therefore the universe is one unified whole with constant change within and without. Nothing happens without a cause and nothing ends without leaving its trace for the creation of something else to follow. If we understand this theory thoroughly we might be able to avoid some of our behaviors to prevent the occurrence of some of the undesirable events for ourselves, to other beings and to our environment which affects us all. After all we too are a part of the nature and our actions or inaction do play an important role in the universal process of promotion and reduction, creation and destruction.

5. The fifth Noble Principe is the law of Dualism
This principe indicates that everything in reality is dualistic. This means  that everything exists along with its opposite. Nothing is absolute; darkness and light exist within each other as do short and tall. Cold harbours a degree of warmth; warm beholds a trace of the cold. Nothing is black or white; everything is both black and white with difference in their ratios. The union of Yin and Yang is the cause for creation, male and female live within each other and everything has the potential of turning into its opposite aspect. If we understood this natural phenomenon we would not be so judgmental, living with anger, hostility and the feelings of retaliation. If we see something undesirable we should not conclude that it is absolutely bad. We should also look for the desirable aspect of the thing within the undesirable aspect. By doing that we may be able to help the good side of the event to overgrow the bad side. But unfortunately based on our inherited ignorance we jump to a conclusion and pass on our judgment and ignore the possibility of the existing trace of good in the bad with the potential of transforming the bad into better.
The following are some of my relevant sayings on this subject
The ignorant looks for darkness within the light and causes sufferings to him/herself and the others while the wise looks for the light within darkness and helps the light to grow.
Darkness and the light are inseparable but not always structured the way we want as an individual or as a Society. Our individual and/or social views can make the difference how we help to shape our world.

The secret of healthy living is Compassion with Love, Peace and Forgiveness to include all and exclude non. 

 

How it has developed? 

After studying and diligently practicing different forms of yoga including Taoist yoga and Patanjaly yoga (commonly known as Eight-fold yoga) and martial arts including Karate-Do, Taekwando, Taichi chuan and Chi Kung. I came to a conclusion that none of these arts by itself was complete, fully effective or fully productive. Meanly because despite their historic connections to various philosophies they have been separated from them due to ignorance of their advocates or by the reality of time and space or both. It is unfortunate that in recent years not only the natural nutritional values of our foods, purity our water and  air have been compromised for convenience and higher profits but also the fundamental values of living arts including music, yoga and martial arts have sacroficed meanly for the same ground. Based on this observation I have dedicated nearly three decades of my life to develop this comprehensive system of martial art to revitalize most if not all of the lost virtues of martial arts. 

 

The process:

With understanding that in order to bring positive changes to any system we need to start from the Root Cause. Accordingly I spent lots of time studying the philosophical roots of these arts. From China I chosen the Taoism, from India I picked 4 out of 7 most ancient philosophies including Vedenta, Samkhya, Buddhism and Yoga. From Central Asia I settleld with Sufism. After completion of my philosophical reaserch I started harmonizing my practices with their root causes meaning the philosophies a new system was created. After mastering the new system I started to intruduce it to my student and named it Zenki-Do the spirit of martial art.

 

Vital points in Zenki-Do

Vital Points for Martial Arts and Self-HealingThere are vital points all over the body, most of which are located on meridians. They are sites where the lifeforce infused. Here we identify the points that can be easily targeted in martial arts and easily reached for self-healing. They are frequently used for healing purposes by Oriental healing modalities, including acupuncture, acupressure, moxibustion, chi kung, shiatsu, kiatsu and tuina.

If any of these vital points are injured it can cause severe problems for the corresponding organs and limbs. Therefore, extra caution should be taken to protect these points against an attack as well as to not target them when training with a partner. It is also fair to say that one should not target any of these points even for self-defence unless absolutely necessary.
Locating Points
Points are located by using body parts rather than a measuring tape. One body inch (or cun in Chinese, pronounced chun) is equivalent to the width of one’s own thumb while three body inches is equivalent to the width of the first four fingers. Other examples are depicted in the diagram below.


                 
                                 

Identifying Points
The vital points in Zenki-Do are identified in the next section in two ways: (1) by their Chinese name and (2) by the meridian on which they are located followed by their designated number.
Points on the Head Region
The head is the most vulnerable part of our body. It harbours the brain, homes the mind, accommodates the consciousness, facilitates the senses and governs the nervous system. Any blow to the head, light or heavy, can lead to serious consequences of one sort or another. There are certain points on the head region that if hit with the right technique can be fatal. On a positive note, these points can also be used for self-healing many disorders.
Points on the top and front of the head
a. Baihui
This point is known to western acupuncturists as GV 20. Baihui means the meeting place of one hundred points. Yogis refer to it as the crown chakra. It is located about eight finger-widths from the third eye on the mid-line of the scalp. This point controls all of the other points in the body. An injury to this point can lead to psychiatric and neurological disorders as well muscular atrophy in the whole body.
The most effective technique to strike this point is to pull the opponent forward and then strike with a vertical hammer fist, the heel of the palm or the ulnar side of a sword hand.
In TCM, Baihui is indicated for relieving headache, dizziness, nasal obstruction, mental disorder and coma.
How to use Baihui in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Locate the point
Form a circle with the thumb and index finger and place the circle on top of your head around Baihui
Place the tip of the other thumb on the point and jiggle for a few moments or until you feel some sort of relief
b. Shenting 
This point is known to acupuncturists as GV 24. Shenting is located about a little finger-width above the midpoint on the frontal hair line. Shenting means temple of high spirit and has a direct connection to the brain. Any injury to this point can harm the brain cells.
The closest point to Shenting is called Shangxing, GV 23, which means the high star. It is located one little finger-width above Shenting. Because of the close proximity of these two points they can be hit in one blow.
A strong blow to these points can fracture the skull and cause damage to the brain as well as affect the nerves. It can also lead to disharmony between the yin and yang energies in the entire body.
The most effective offensive techniques to hit these points are a knife hand strike and a hammer fist strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect these points is to yield. If that is not an option, use an upper-level forearm ward-off or a scissor hand ward-off.
TCM indications for Shenting include anxiety, insomnia, epilepsy, headache, vertigo and rhinorrhea.
How to use Shenting in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Place the index and ring fingers of your favourite hand with their tips together on top of the middle finger for support
Place the middle finger on top of Shenting
Rub up and down until you feel some sort of relief
c. Yintang
Yintang is commonly known as the third eye. By western acupuncturists it is referred to as Extra 2. It is located between the two medial ends of the eyebrows. It is one of the easiest points to locate for a strike. There are two neighbouring sensitive points above and below Yintang, Hongtang and Shangen. If they are all hit together the effect is more grievous.
In Zenki-Do practices we refer to this point as the upper dantian. It controls the pituitary gland and communicates with the whole body.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike all three points at once are the heel of the palm and a knife hand strike. Even though Yintang can be hit with a knuckle by itself, which can cause severe damage to the eyes and to the brain, using the palm or a knife hand is more damaging because it covers all three points.
The most effective defensive technique to protect these points is to yield. If that is not an option, use an upper-level forearm ward-off or a scissor hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point include visual problems, frontal headache, nose bleed, rhinorrhea, insomnia, dizziness, poor concentration, restlessness, nasal congestion and facial pain.
If used correctly it could improve extra sensory perception.
How to use Yintang in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Pinch the regional skin of Yintang with the tips of your thumb and index finger of your favourite hand a couple of times
Place your middle fingertips on Yintang  then massage laterally towards Taiyang (the temples) and repeat several times
d. Chengqi
This point is also known as ST 1. It is located between the eyeball and the infraorbital ridge. Injury to this point, depending on the severity of the blow, can lead to blindness, loss of control in the eye and loss of consciousness.
The most effective techniques to damage this point are a leopard fist and an index finger strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is to yield. If that is not an option, use an upper level forearm ward-off or a scissor hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are marked as redness and pain in the eye, night blindness, eyeball twitch and facial paralysis.
How to use Chengqi in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
It is best to combine this point with an eyebrow massage by placing the tips of the middle fingers of both hands on Zanzhu (BL 2), which is located on the medial extremities of the eyebrows
Massage laterally toward Taiyang (the temples)
Move the fingers and place them at the point below the inner cantos of the eyes and massage laterally to Taiyang
Repeat alternatively several times
e. Renzhong
Renzhong is known to western acupuncturists as GV 26. It is located at the junction of the upper third and middle third of the upper lip.
This point is the meeting place of the yin and yang meridians in the body. A mild blow to this point can lead to mental confusion, sudden loss of consciousness or sudden death.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are a knife hand strike, index finger strike, middle finger strike and leopard fist.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is to yield. If that is not an option, use an upper-level forearm ward-off or a scissor hand ward-off.
In TCM this point is indicated for restoring consciousness, mental confusion, excessive heat in the head, facial paralysis, hysteria, mental disorder, lower back pain and coma.
How to use Renzhong in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Place the tip of your index or middle finger on Renzhong
Exert a strong upward pressure at a 45 degree angle towards the root of the nose
f. Chengjiang
Chengjiang, or CV 24, is located in the depression in the centre of the chin about half an inch below the lower lip. A powerful blow to this point can cause loss of consciousness, physical damage to the lower gums and teeth, deviation of the mouth and mental disorder.
The most effective offensive techniques to damage this point are a leopard fist thrust and an index finger strike.
The most effective defensive technique is to yield. If that is not an option, use are an upper-level forearm ward-off, upper-level sword-hand ward-off or upper-level scissor hand ward-off. 
In TCM this point is indicated for disorders such as swelling of the gums, toothache, mental disorder and deviation of mouth and eyes.
How to use Chengjiang in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use either the tip of middle finger or index finger exerting gentle pressure with circular massage. 

Points on the side of the head
a. Taiyang
This point is located at the tender depression one finger-width posterior to the midpoint of a line drawn between the outer corner of the eye and the lateral end of the eyebrow. Commonly this area is known as the temple. It is known to Western acupuncturists as an extra point, usually Extra 1.
As this point is anatomically the junction of four skull bones, a heavy blow to this point can result in a fracture to the skull, serious brain damage or death.
Please note that the left temple is called Taiyang, meaning ultimate yang, and the right temple is called Taiyin, meaning ultimate yin.
A simultaneous blow to both temples can damage the entire yin and yang factors in the body.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are a roundhouse double fist strike targeting both temples, roundhouse heeling hand strike and roundhouse foot strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is to yield. If that is not an option, use an upper level forearm ward-off or an upper level sword hand ward-off.
In TCM this point is indicated for relieving headaches including migraines, eye disorders, dizziness, and deviation of the eye and mouth.
How to use Taiyang in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Place the tip of both middle fingers on Taiyang and exert a light pressure
Massage in a counter-clockwise motion continuously several times
b. Tongziliao
Tongziliao is known to Western acupuncturists as GB 1. It is located one thumb width lateral to the outer corner of the eye in the depression on the lateral side of the orbit.  
This point is close enough to Taiyang that they can be hit together by one large surface strike. When hit together, the effect of the blow increases tremendously, potentially causing severe damage to the brain as well as to the eye.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are the same as Yintang.
The most effective defensive technique is the same as Yintang.
TCM indications for Tongziliao are similar to Taiyang.
How to use Tongziliao in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
The same as Taiyang

Points on the back of the head
Please note that the most practical way to protect vital points on the back of the body from head to foot are (1) not to expose them to the opponent and (2) by way of strategic yielding.
a. Fungfu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as GV 16. It is located about one inch above the hairline on the mid-line below the occipital protuberance. An injury to this point can lead to mental problems, headaches and unconsciousness.
The most effective techniques to hit this point are a sword hand strike, back-fist strike and square fist strike.
In TCM this point is indicated for headache, stiffness in the neck, blurred vision, nose bleed, sore throat and mental disorder.
How to use Fungfu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Place one thumb on top of the other on Fungfu while resting your palms on the back of your head
Press deeply with your thumbs then release
Continue several times or until you feel some degree of relief
b. Yamen 
Yamen is known to Western acupuncturists as GV 15. It is located at the base of the skull about half an inch directly above the midline of the posterior hair line in the depression below the spinous process of the first cervical vertebra. If this point is hit hard enough, it can severely damage the brain and cause mental disorders.
The most effective offensive techniques for this point are a sword hand strike and back fist strike.  
In TCM Yamen is indicated for mental disorders, epilepsy, occipital headache and stiffness of the neck.
How to use Yamen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Use the same method as Fungfu (previous point)
c. Fengchi 
Fengchi is also known as GB 20. It is located in the depression behind the ears at the same level as Fungfu (GV 16).
The most effective technique to strike this point is a fist thrust with the middle knuckle of the middle finger sticking out and aimed at this point.  
In TCM this point is indicated for headache, sleep disorder, vertigo, pain in the neck, painful eye, tinnitus, common cold, nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea and febrile diseases.
How to use Fengchi in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Place the tips of both thumbs on Fengchi on either side with your palms resting on your head
Press and rub circularly in a counter-clockwise motion several times or until you feel some sort of relief
d. Tianzhu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 10. It is located about one inch lateral to Yamen (GV 15). Injury to this point can disturb the entire energetics system of the body.  If Yamen and Tianzhu are hit together they can cause more severe damage to the brain. This can cause mental confusion and dismantle the opponent's energetics system causing clumsiness and disharmony between the mind and body.
The most effective techniques to hit both Yamen and Tianzhu together at once are a sword-hand strike and a back fist strike.
TCM indications for this point are headache, nasal obstruction, stiffness in the neck and pain in the shoulder and back.
How to use Tianzhu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Place the tips of both thumbs on Tianzhu on either side with your palms resting on the back of your head
Press and rub circularly in a counter-clockwise motion several times or until you feel some sort of relief
Points on the Trunk of the Body
Points on the front midline
a. Tiantu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as CV 22. It is located in the throat, right in the centre of the supra-sternal fossa. It partially controls the upper limbs. If injured this point can lead to muscle atrophy in the upper limbs as well as damage to the function of the lung affecting the voice and vital energy.
The most effective technique to hit this point is an index finger or middle finger strike.
The most effective technique to protect this point is to yield. Otherwise, use an upper level forearm ward-off, upper level sword-hand ward-off or scissor hand ward-off.
In TCM, Tiantu is indicated for cough, sore throat, asthma, sudden hoarseness, difficulty swallowing and goitre.
How to use Tiantu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Press either the middle or index finger on Tiantu in a downward angle in such a way that you can feel the bone of the sternal notch
Apply pressure and hold for 7 seconds then release
Repeat several times
b. Tanzhong
This point is known to western acupuncturists as CV 17. It is located in the centre of the chest between the two nipples. It is related to the emotional heart and is also considered to be the influential point of chi (pure energy). In Zenki-Do, it is referred to as the middle dantian and is considered the second major energy centre in the body. This centre stores energy for the functional activities of the lungs and heart and stores pure energy (prana). It partially controls the upper limbs.
Damage to this point can disturb the function of pure energy causing paralyses of the upper limbs and potentially numbness in the entire body system. Injury can also cause severe problems for the corresponding organs as well as to the functioning of the breasts for women, including lactation. A heavy blow to this point can cause death.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike this point are a fist thrust, heeling hand thrust, elbow strike and front heel foot thrust.
The most effective defensive technique is to yield. Otherwise, use a middle level forearm ward-off or sword hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are pain in the chest, palpitation, insufficient lactation, asthma and difficulty swallowing.
How to use Tanzhong in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Place either the tip of the thumb or middle finger on Tanzhong with a light pressure
Massage in a counter-clockwise circular motion several times
c. Jiuwei
This point, also known as CV 15, is located in a vulnerable region commonly referred to as the solar plexus. It is located on the front midline of the abdomen about one inch directly below the tip of the xiphoid process. A blow to this point can cause cardiac arrest, nausea and mental confusion.
The most effective offensive technique to strike this point is a spear hand thrust.
The most effective technique to protect this point is to yield. Otherwise, use a middle level forearm ward-off or sword-hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point include pain in the cardiac region and chest, nausea and mental disorder.
How to use Jiuwei in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Form a spear hand with the three inside fingers side by side together in a straight line
Place the tip of the index finger on Jiuwei and gently press straight forward
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times
d. Juque
This point is also known as CV 14. It is the front alarming point of the heart and is located about one inch directly below Jiuwei (CV 15).
Due to their close proximity, Jiuwei and Juque can be hit at the same time with a spear hand thrust. The effect is greater damage to the function of the heart with symptoms of pain in the cardiac region and chest. Other symptoms such as nausea and mental disorder can occur.
The most effective offensive technique to strike this point is a spear hand thrust.
The most effective technique to protect this point is to yield. Otherwise, use a middle level forearm ward-off or sword hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are similar to Jiuwei (CV 15).
How to use Juque in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
When treating Jiuwei (CV 15) as described above, the ring finger naturally presses on Juque (CV 14). Or, if not sure, add the tip of the little finger to the group.
e. Zhongwan
This point is known to western acupuncturists as CV 12. It is the alarming point of the stomach and the influential point of all yang organs, including the large intestine, stomach, small intestine, bladder and gallbladder. It is located on the upper abdomen on the frontal midline about five finger-widths above the umbilicus, or the midpoint between the navel and the tip of the sternum. It controls all of the abdominal organs, in particular the stomach and spleen.
This is one of the easiest points to target. If this point is injured it can cause severe damage to the digestive system and can consequently lead to sudden nausea and vomiting. In the long run, injury to this point can cause gradual fatigue and anaemia.
The most effective offensive techniques on this point are a square fist thrust, front foot thrust and roundhouse foot strike. A blow covering a larger surface can strike two neighbouring points, Jianli also known as CV 11 below and Shangwan also known as CV 13 above. All three together in one blow produce a greater effect.
The most effective technique to protect these points is to yield. Otherwise, use a middle level forearm ward-off, low level forearm ward-off or palm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are stomachache, nausea, vomiting, abdominal distention, acid reflex and indigestion. 
How to use Zhongwan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Make a fist with your thumb sticking out
Place the tip of your thumb on Zhongwan and press perpendicularly
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times
f. Chihai
Chihai is also known as CV 6. It means the sea of chi and is also known as the lower dantian. It is located about two finger-widths below the navel. Energetically, this point controls the lower limbs, but it is also the storage house for original chi. It is a very common point for Zen and Taoist meditation and concentration.  
If this point is damaged the consequences can be atrophy of the lower limbs, confusion in the mind, general fatigue, mental depression and overall illness in the long run. Since this point is the home of congenital essence, damage to this point can lead to other reproductive disorders including enuresis, impotency, nocturnal emission, edema and gynaecological disorders for females.
The techniques to strike this point are a fist thrust, front foot thrust, side foot thrust and roundhouse foot strike.
The most effective technique to protect this point is to yield. Otherwise, use a low level forearm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are abdominal pain, enuresis, nocturnal emission, impotence, chronic fatigue, uterine bleeding, edema, irregular menstruation, dysmenorrhea and amenorrhea,
How to use Chihai in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Make a fist with your thumb sticking out
Place the tip of your thumb on Chihai and press perpendicularly
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times
g. Guanyuan
Guanyuan is also known as CV 4 by western acupuncturists. It is located approximately four finger-widths below the navel and controls the reproductive organs. It is considered the alarm point of the small intestine. It also harmonizes the heart (the house of fire) and the kidney (the house of water) in the body. In other words, it balances the yin and yang energies in body.
Through this point the psychic energy is discharged by the subconscious mind in a constant manner.
If this point is injured it can damage the reproductive system, lead to disharmony of yin and yang in the body as well as cause mental and emotional problems.
The techniques to strike this point are the same as Chihai.
The most effective techniques to protect this point are the same as Chihai as well as a downward scissor hand ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are similar to Chihai.
How to use Guanyuan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
The treatment method of Guanyuan is similar to Chihai
h. Testicles
The testes are one of the most vulnerable extra organs in the male body. If they are hit, loss of consciousness, severe damage to the motor functioning of the testes and inability to breathe can occur.
They are easy to strike using a downward square fist or a front foot thrust.
The most effective technique to protect the testes is to yield. Otherwise, use a low level fist ward-off or a downward scissor hand ward-off.

Points on the sides of the trunk
a. Zhongfu
Zhongfu is also known to western acupuncturists as LU 1. It is located at the level of the first intercostal space about 6 inches lateral to the anterior midline of the chest. It is the front alarm point of the lung. A strong blow to this point can disturb the flow of chi and blood throughout the chest affecting both the lung and heart systems.
Offensive techniques suitable for this point are a spear-hand thrust and a square fist thrust. Even an index finger thrust can cause severe damage.
Defensive techniques suitable for protecting this point include yielding and an upper-level ward-off.  
TCM indications for this point include asthma, cough, chest pain, shoulder pain and upper back pain.
How to use Zhonfu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Make a fist with your thumb sticking out
Place the tip of your thumb on Zhonfu and press perpendicularly
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times
b. Qimen
This point is known to acupuncturists as LV 14. It is located directly below the nipple on the sixth intercostal space about 5 finger-widths lateral to the frontal midline. It is the front alarming point of the liver. A blow to this point can cause respiratory dysfunction, loss of consciousness and circulatory failure.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike this point are a fist thrust, heeling hand thrust or foot thrust.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding, middle level forearm ward-off, middle level sword hand ward-off and middle level palm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point include hypochondriac pain, acid regurgitation, abdominal distention, febrile disease and depression.
How to use Qimen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use the palm to massage Qimen in a circular counter-clockwise direction 
c. Riyue
This point is known as GB 24. It is the front alarming point of the gallbladder. Riyue is located directly below the nipple in the seventh intercostal space.
Due to its close association with the liver, lung and spleen, a heavy strike to this point can lead to death from heavy nasal bleeding.
Due to its location this point is one of the easiest points to be struck by a fist thrust, knife hand thrust, front foot thrust, side foot thrust or knee strike.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding, middle level forearm ward-off, middle level sword hand ward-off and middle level palm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point include pain in the hypochondriac region, vomiting, acid reflex and jaundice.
How to use Riyue in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use the palm to massage Riyue in a circular counter-clockwise direction
d. Zhangmen
Zhangmen is known to western acupuncturists as LV 13. It is located below the free end of the 11th rib bone. This point is considered the influential point of all yin organs, which include the lung, heart, spleen and liver. It means that damage to this point can affect the function of all yin organs.
This is one of the deadliest points. A hard blow can cause death while a mild blow can disturb the flow of chi and blood in the entire body causing significant ill effect.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are a square fist thrust, knife hand thrust or front foot thrust.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding, middle level forearm ward-off, middle level sword hand ward-off and middle level palm ward-off.
In TCM this point is indicated for hypochondriac pain, abdominal swelling and indigestion.
How to use Zhangmen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptom:
Using the tips of the three middle fingers of a spear hand, press perpendicularly on Zhangmen
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times 
e. Jingmen
This point is also known as GB 25. It is the front alarming point of the kidney. It is located at the lower border of the free end of the 12th rib bone. If injured it disrupts the function of the digestive and kidney systems as well as vital chi.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike this point are a square fist thrust, foot thrust and knife hand thrust.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding and a low level forearm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point include abdominal swelling and pain in the lumbar and hypochondriac regions.
How to use Jingmen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use the tips of the three inside fingers to press perpendicularly on Jingmen
Hold for 3 seconds then release
Repeat several times

Points on the back midline
a. Dazhui
This point is known to western acupuncturists as GV 14. It is located at the base of the neck below the seventh cervical vertebra. As this point connects all six yang meridians of the upper and lower limbs, an injury to this point can affect all of these interconnected meridians and consequently the function of the corresponding organs. Other potential disorders to develop are stiffness of the neck and shoulders, epilepsy, mental disorder, lung disorder and frozen shoulder.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike this point are square fist thrust, elbow strike and back fist strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM this point is indicated for pain in the neck, febrile diseases, cough, asthma and stiffness of the back.
How to use Dazhui in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Place your middle fingertip on the point
Press and knead circularly in a counter-clockwise motion
b. Shandao
This point is known to western acupuncturists as GV 11. It is located below the spinous process of the fifth thoracic vertebra. As this point is closely related to the heart and lung systems a severe blow can lead to cardiac arrest, difficulty breathing and loss of consciousness.
The most effective techniques to strike this point include back fist strike, elbow strike and foot thrust. 
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM, this point is indicated for palpitation, anxiety, poor memory, cough and cardiac pain.
c. Mingmen
Mingmen means the gate of immortality and is known to western acupuncturists as GV 4. It is located between the second and third spinal vertebra. An injury to this point can cause severe congenital problems, including impotency and menstrual problems, as well digestive problems, lower back pain and disruption to kidney functions, which include storing the congenital essence (which governs human reproduction), dominating water metabolism, aiding in the production of marrow for brain and bones, manufacturing blood and opening into the ear.
The most effective offensive techniques to hit this point are sword hand strike, side foot thrust and elbow strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM, this point is indicated for lower back pain, impotency, nocturnal emission, irregular menstruation, indigestion and excessive vaginal discharge.
How to use Mingmen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms: 
Place both thumbs, one on top of the other, on this point
Press and hold for a few seconds
Repeat several times
Points on both sides of the spine on the Bladder Meridian
a.  Feishu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 13. It is located 1.5 inches lateral to the lower border of the spinous process of the third vertebra between the spine and shoulder blade.
Feishu energetically corresponds with the lung system. Therefore, any damage to this point will affect the functional activities of the lung, including governing chi, controlling respiration, regulating fluid passages, providing oxygen for the formation of blood and general purification of the body.
A severe blow to this point can lead to immediate paralysis of the upper limbs, chocking, shortage of breath and loss of consciousness. In the long run it may manifest into diseases of the lung with severe fatigue, edema, weight gain and puffy face. 
The most effective techniques to hit this point are square fist thrust, foot thrust and elbow strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.  
b. Xinshu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 15. It is located 1.5 inches lateral to lower level of the spinous process of the fifth vertebra.
Energetically Xinshu is related to the heart hence any damage to this pint can affect the function of the heart system, including control of blood circulation, harbouring the mind and facilitating speech. A hard hit to this point can lead to loss of consciousness and stoppage of breath.
The most effective offensive techniques to hit this point are square fist thrust, elbow strike, front foot thrust and roundhouse foot thrust.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM this point is indicated for cardiac pain, loss of memory, panicking, cough, palpitation, mania and epilepsy.
c. Ganshu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 18. It is located 1.5 inches lateral to the midline of the back at the level of the lower border of the spinous process of the ninth thoracic vertebra.
This point has an energetics connection with the liver system. A severe blow to this point can disturb the functions of the liver, such as maintaining the free flow of energy throughout the body, governing the tendons, storing and distributing the blood and manifesting in the eyes. Severe damage to Ganshu can dismantle the liver organ and affect all or part of its functional activities depending upon the severity of the damage. A strong enough blow can paralyze the torso region right away and put the attacker out of commission.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are square fist thrust, front foot thrust, side foot thrust and elbow strike. 
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM practices Ganshu is indicated for hypochondriac pain, redness of the eye, blurring of the vision, mental disorder, upper backache, nose bleed and blood in the saliva.
d. Pishu 
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 20. It is located 1.5 inches lateral to the level of the lower border of the spinous process of eleventh thoracic vertebra.
Energetically this point corresponds with the spleen organ, meaning that damage to this point can lead to interruption to the functions of the spleen system, which includes transforming and transporting nutritional fluids, controlling the formation of blood and governing the muscles and limbs. Therefore, a strong blow to this point can dismantle and paralyze the limbs immediately and affect the functional activities of the entire organ system in the long run.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are square fist thrust, front foot thrust, side foot strike and elbow strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond. 
In TCM practices, this point is indicated for pain in the stomach, vomiting, abdominal bloating, edema, backache, eating disorder and profuse menstruation.
How to use Pishu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Place your palms on either side of your body in such a way that your thumbs rest on these points
Using gentle pressure, massage both points with your thumbs in a circular motion counter-clockwise for pain and clockwise for deficiency
Continue until some sense of relief occurs

Points on the Upper Limbs
On the outside of the arms
a.   Jaianyu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as LI 15. It is located in the depression on the lateral side of the arm at the shoulder joint just below the end of the tail of the scapula.
A blow to this point can lead to frozen shoulder, pain in the neck and paralysis of the arm.
The most effective offensive techniques to strike this point are square fist thrust and heeling hand thrust.
The safest defensive techniques are yielding followed by upper-level sword-hand ward-off if needed.
In TCM, this point is indicated for treatment of pain in the arm and shoulder and motor impairment of the arm.
How to use Jaianyu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Locate the point
Place the tip of your middle finger on the point
Gently press and knead until some feeling of relief occurs
b. Quchei
This point is known to western acupuncturists as LI 11. It is located at the elbow joint in the depression at the lateral end of elbow crease, directly below Jianyu. 
An injury this point can lead to tennis elbow, paralysis of the lower arm, irregular blood pressure, skin disease and febrile diseases.
The most effective offensive techniques for this point are a tiger claw grab with deep thumb pressure and sword hand strike.
The safest techniques to avoid or release from such a grab are yeilding followed by a circular downward forearm ward-off.
TCM indications for this point are toothache, redness and pain in the eye due to excessive heat in the liver system, high blood pressure and motor impairment of the arm.
How to use Quchei in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Hold the elbow with the opposite hand
Place the tip of your thumb on Quchei
Gently press and knead in a counter-clockwise motion         
Keep alternating between pressing and kneading
c. Waiguan
This point, also known as TW 5, is located three finger-widths above the dorsal crease of the wrist on the midline.
An injury to this point can potentially cause paralysis of the upper limb, temporal headache, stiff neck and disorder of the ear.
The most effective offensive technique for this point is a sword hand strike.
The safest technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
TCM indications for this point are febrile diseases, stiffness in the neck, motor impairment of the elbow and arm, and pain in the fingers and hand.
How to use Waiguan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Hold your wrist at the crease with your opposite hand
Place the tip of your thumb on Waiguan
Gently press and knead in a counter-clockwise motion
Keep alternating between pressing and kneading
d. Hegu
Hegu is known to western acupuncturists as LI 4. It located on the dorsum of the hand between the first and second metacarpal bone.
Injury to this point can lead to disorder of the thumb, forefinger or wrist joint, facial paralysis and headache.
The most effective offensive technique is to tightly grab this point with the thumb above and the index finger below to cause severe pain. This technique can also be used as a good analgesic point for the body for both therapy and anaesthesia.
The safest defensive way to release the grab is yield and respond.
TCM indications of this point are pain in the neck, nose bleed, nasal obstruction, toothache, swelling of the face, sore throat, facial paralysis, febrile diseases, abdominal pain and motor impairment of the upper limbs.
How to use Hegu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Grab the web between your thumb and index finger with the thumb and index finger of your opposite hand in such a way that your thumb is on top
Massage Hegu firmly with your thumb and the upper portion of your index finger

On the inside of the arms
a. Elbow crease area
Please note that the points on the inside and around the elbow crease are considered by TCM the sea points of the lung, large intestine, heart, small intestine, pericardium and triple warmer meridians. These points are known to western acupuncturists as LU 5, LI 11, HT 3, SI 8, PC 3 and TW 10 respectively.
A blow to this area can disrupt the functional activities of the corresponding internal organs with severe consequences including cardiac pain, numbness of the arm, breathing disorders, problems in the lung system, numbness or paralysis of the arm and mental disorders.
The most effective offensive techniques for this point are a sword hand strike and a tiger claw grab.
The safest technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
TCM indications for these points are for treating the corresponding organs.
How to use the points in and around the elbow crease in self-kiatsu to treat conditions related to the corresponding organs:
Use a grab and knead technique by holding your elbow in the palm of your opposite hand
Press and knead on the chosen sea point using the tip of your thumb
For lungs, massage on LU 5 located in the depression on the radial side of the tendon
For pericardium, massage the PC 3 in the depression on the ulnar side of the tendon
For heart, use the HT 3 in the depression 1 inch medial to PC 3
For small intestine, use SI 8 in the depression between the elbow end of the ulna and the medial epicondyle of the humerus 
For triple warmer, use TW 10 located about 1 inch above the head of the elbow end of the ulna bone
For large intestine, use LI 11 in the depression at the lateral end of the elbow crease
b. Neiguan
Also known as PC 6, this point is located three finger-widths above the wrist crease on the midline of forearm between the two tendons. 
An injury to this point can potentially lead to heart disease, mental disorders, insomnia, anxiety and disorder of the forearm.
The most effective offensive techniques for this point are a tiger claw grab exerting a deep pressure with the tip of the thumb and sword hand strike.
The safest defensive technique is yield and respond.
In TCM, this point is indicated for pain in the hypochondriac region, palpitation, chest pain, stomachache, nausea, vomiting, hiccups, mental disorder, insomnia, febrile diseases, irritability and pain in the elbow.
How to use this Neiguan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Hold your wrist at the crease with your other hand
Place your thumb on PC 6
Press and knead
c. Laokung
Laokung is known among western acupuncturists as PC 8. It is located in the centre of the palm where the tip of the middle finger will touch when making a fist.
An injury to this point can lead to disorder of the palm, cardiac pain and mental disorders.
The most possible cause of injury to this point in martial arts will be blocking a kick or punch with the palm of the hand.
TCM indications of this point are cardiac pain, mental disorder, vomiting and nausea.
How to use Laokung in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Locate the point
Place the tip of your thumb on this point while placing your remaining four fingers on the dorsum of your treated hand
Press and knead
Points on the Lower Limbs
Point on the buttocks
a. Huantiao
This point is known to western acupuncturists as GB 30. It is located about one-third lateral and two-thirds medial from the hiatus of the sacrum.
Damage to this point can lead to symptoms such as sciatica, paralysis of the lower limbs and lower back pain.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are a foot thrust, elbow strike and hammer fist strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond. 
In TCM this point is indicated for pain in the lumbar region and thighs and muscular atrophy of the lower limbs.
How to use Huantiao in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit in kneeling pose if you can
Place the heel of your foot on this point for 5 minutes
Alternatively, use your middle fingertip or the bottom of a pencil to knead the point

Points on the back of the legs
a. Chengfu
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 36. It is located at the midpoint of the inferior gluteal crease on the back of the thigh. A strong blow to this point can create excruciating pain along the sciatic nerve and lead to loss of motor functioning of the leg.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are sword foot strike and sword hand strike.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond. 
In TCM this point is indicated for lower back pain, muscular atrophy of the lower limb, constipation and motor impairment of leg.
How to use Chengfu in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit in kneeling posture if possible
Place the heel of your foot on this point for 5 minutes at a time
Alternatively, use your middle fingertip to knead
b. Yinmen
This point is known to western acupuncturists as BL 37. It is located about 6 inches below Chengfu on the midline on the posterior of the thigh. Damage to this point can lead to sciatica, lower back pain and paralysis of lower limb.
The most effective techniques to strike this point are a foot strike, including a side foot thrust and a front foot thrust.
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM this point is indicated for the same symptoms as Chengfu, except not for constipation.
How to use Yinmen in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched in front of you
Knead this point using your middle finger
c. Weizhong
This point is also known as BL 40. It is located at the midpoint of the transverse crease of the popliteal fossa (on the back of the knee). This is one of the easiest points to target due to its location. Damage to this point can lead to serious or permanent knee problems, sciatica, genitourinary disorders and paralysis of the lower limb. Also, hitting this point can cause the opponent to bend backward, putting them in a vulnerable position for a subsequent attack.
The most effective technique to hit this point is a side foot thrust. 
The most effective defensive technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM this point is indicated for lower back pain, motor impairment of the lower limb and hip joint, muscular atrophy of the leg and pain and numbness of the leg.
How to use Weizhong in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use a similar method as Yinmen (BL 37)
d. Weiyang
This point is also known as BL 39. It is located about an inch lateral to Weizhong. When Weizhong is hit by a side foot thrust, Weiyang is inevitably hit as well, causing greater damage to the lower limb.
TCM indications for this point are the same as Weizhong. 
How to use Weiyang in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Treat the same way as Weizhong
e. Chengshan
This point is also known to western acupuncturists as BL 57. Chengshan is located about 8 body inches directly below Weizhong, or about halfway between Weizhong and the ankle joint. Damage to this point can lead to paralysis of the lower limb, problems with the calf muscle and sciatica.
The best techniques to strike this point are side foot thrust and front foot thrust. 
The best technique to protect this point is yield and respond.
In TCM this point is indicated for lower back pain, sciatica, spasm of the calf muscle and beriberi.
How to use Chengshan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Treat the same way as Weizhong

Points on the front of the legs above the knees
a. Liangqui
This point is known to western acupuncturists as ST 34. It is located about three finger-widths above the latrosuperior border of the kneecap.
If it is hit hard, this point can cause cramping of the leg muscles and consequently dismantle the motor function of the leg and cause severe pain in the lower abdomen. 
The most effective offensive techniques for this point are side foot thrust and front foot thrust.
The safest defensive techniques are yield and respond and low level fist ward-off.
In TCM, this point is indicated for pain in the knee, stomachache and motor impairment of the lower limbs.
How to use Lianqui in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with legs your outstretched in front of your, or sit on a chair
Place your thumb tips on the point and knead
b. Xuehai
Xuehai translates as sea of blood. It is known to western acupuncturists as SP 10. It is located three finger-widths above the mediosuperior border of the kneecap, or about three to four finger-widths medial to Liangqui. 
In general, damage to this point can cause numbness of the leg and knee ache. In particular, damage to this point can cause blood disorders causing diseases such as skin problems, irregular menstruation and blood deficiency. 
The most effective offensive techniques to hit this point are side foot thrust and front foot thrust.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding, low level fist ward-off and low level sword hand ward-off.
In TCM this point is indicated for pain in the medial aspect of the thigh, pain in the knee, weakness of the lower limbs, irregular menstruation and other blood related gynaecological disorders.
How to treat Xuehai in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Use the same method as Liangqui (ST 34)

Points on front of the legs below the knee joints
a. Zusanli
Zusanli translates as the sea point of the stomach meridian. Known to western acupuncturists as ST 36, this point is located about four finger-widths below the kneecap and one finger-width from the anterior border of the tibia. Injury to this point can cause immediate pain and numbness in the lower leg. In the long run this can develop into gastric pain, indigestion, bloating of the stomach, edema, asthma, dizziness, insomnia and mania.
The most effective offensive techniques are front foot thrust, side foot thrust and roundhouse foot strike.
The most effective defensive techniques are yielding, low level fist ward-off and low level sword hand ward-off.
In TCM this point is indicated for stomach-ache, vomiting, abdominal distention, mastitis, pain in the knee and leg, enteritis, edema, general weaknesses, asthma, digestive problems, insomnia, dizziness, mania and unilateral paralysis.
How to use Zusanli in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor or on a chair
Use one thumb on top of the other for support
Press and knead
b. Fenglong
Fenglong is known to western acupuncturists as ST 40. It is located about eight body inches (one body inch is equivalent to the width of your thumb) above the external malleolus. A direct blow to this point can induce excruciating pain and paralysis of the lower leg, headache, vertigo, nausea and loss of control.
The most effective offensive techniques are foot thrusts.
The most effective defensive technique is yielding.
In TCM this point is indicated for vertigo, headache, asthma, chest pain, muscular atrophy, motor impairment and paralysis of the lower limb.
How to use Fenglong in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with legs your outstretched in front of you
Fold one leg in towards you so it is within reach
Press and knead using thumb on thumb
c. Sanyinjiao
Also known to western acupuncturists as SP 6, this point is located about four finger-widths above the tip of the medial malleolus near the medial border of the tibia. If damaged can lead to gastrointestinal disorders, genitourinary disorders, skin disorders, lower back pain, paralysis of the lower limb, disorders in the mouth, irregular menstruation, impotency and insomnia.
The most effective offensive technique to hit this point is a low level foot strike.
The most effective defensive technique is yielding.
In TCM this point is indicated for abdominal pain, abdominal distention, dysmenorrhea, irregular menstruation, uterine bleeding, prolapsed uterus, delayed labour, nocturnal emission, impotency, edema, pain in the external genitalia, motor impairment of the limbs, muscular atrophy, paralysis and pain in the lower limbs, dizziness, vertigo, headache and insomnia.
How to use Sanyinjiao in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched in front of you
Pull one leg in towards your body within reach
Use thumb on thumb to press and knead in a clockwise motion
d. Jiexi
Also known as ST 41, this point is located on the dorsum of the foot on the ankle crease at the level of the tip of the external malleolus in the depression between the two tendons. An injury to this point can lead to paralysis of the leg, dizziness and possibly facial paralysis.
The most effective offensive technique to strike this point is a twisting heel step.
The most effective defensive technique is yielding.
In TCM this point is indicated for treatment of pain in the ankle joint, muscular atrophy, motor impairment of the foot, paralysis of the leg and vertigo.
How to use Jiexi in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched in front of you
Grab your foot to be treated with both hands
Use the tips of your thumbs to press and knead

e. Taichong
This point is known to western acupuncturists at LV 3. It is located on the dorsum of the foot in the depression distal to the junction of the first and second metatarsal bones. An injury to this point can induce severe pain in the leg and hip leading to motor impairment of the leg.
The most effective technique to hit this point is a twisting heel step.
The most effective defensive technique is yielding.
In TCM this point is indicated for headache, dizziness, insomnia, vertigo, depression, anger, deviation of the mouth, pain in the hypochondriac region and pain in the foot.
How to use Taichong in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched
Grab your foot to be treated with both hands
Use the tips of your thumbs to press and release several times 
e. Yongquan
This point is also known as KI 1. It is located on the sole of the foot in the depression when the foot is in a plantar position. It is approximately one-third of the distance between the base of the second toe and the back of the heel. Yongquan is translated as bubbling spring. From this point the kidney chi flourishes and rises to the kidney system and the rest of the body.
If it is hit hard, this point can cause excessive hot blood to rush to the head causing headache, visual impairment, vertigo, congestion of blood in the liver, bleeding nose, vomiting of blood, lower back pain, knee ache and general fatigue.
The most effective offensive technique to strike this point are a fist thrust with the middle knuckle of the index or middle finger aiming directly at this point. But this is only applicable if the opponent uses a foot technique with bare feet. Otherwise, focus on the therapeutic aspect of this point for healing purposes.
In TCM, this point is indicated for headache, dizziness, blurring of vision, loss of voice, feverish sensation in the sole and loss of consciousness. 
How to use Yongquan in self-kiatsu to alleviate the above symptoms:
Sit on the floor with your legs outstretched
Grab your foot to be treated and place it in front of you on the floor, or place it on your lap
Use thumb on thumb to press, hold and release
Repeat this procedure several times

  

The Art of Healthy Living Workshop

This workshop focuses on three principles of Right understanding (pilosophy),  Right practice and Right diet in both theoretical and practical fashion.
The participants will learn about the functions of their body systems from Oriental medicine point of view,  identify the foods that are most suitable for their body system  and establish an enjoyable health-promoting routine to practice in the comfort of their own home. This program also includes self kiatsu massage.

 

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Published on  January 5th, 2021